Histamine — The Good, The Bad, The Ugly…

Many of you are concerned about high histamine. There is a great deal of information out there on it. This is a link to some well organized, comprehensive information: http://www.histamine-intolerance.info/. And if you need more, here is more: http://chriskresser.com/headaches-hives-and-heartburn-could-histamine-be-the-cause.

Below are the comments from Dr. Amy Yasko’s upcoming free, online book about high histadine and histamine:

Low tetrahydrofolate (THF) levels can cause elevated histidine. Elevations in histidine, in turn, cause increased levels of anserine and carnosine. So, high histidine along with high anserine and carnosine may indicate a need for THF.

Consider using All in One or Ultimate B. In addition, check FIGLU levels on a MAP test, as FIGLU will also climb If there is not sufficient THF. Thus, high FIGLU may be an indirect sign of excess histidine.

High levels of histidine may depress the levels of other amino acids, as well as be related to high cholesterol. Tests can be run to look at cholesterol levels. In addition, high histidine can translate to increased histamine which is a factor in allergic reactions and inflammation. This can be exacerbated by low copper, as copper is needed for mono amine oxidase (MAO) activity, which breaks down histamine.

Also, check taurine, as high taurine may indicate increased CBS enzyme activity. Increased CBS activity can generate excess H2S, which may decrease MAO enzyme activity and the breakdown of histamine. This may increase histamine levels. Quercetin can help with high histamine, but quercetin can inhibit COMT, so this can be non optimal for those who are COMT ++. Cherries are a natural source of quercetin, so while cherries may help with inflammation and some forms of arthritis, high quercetin levels may cause problems for those who are COMT ++ who already have slow COMT activity. Licorice can also inhibit MAO, so along with low copper and high H2S, these factors may reduce the breakdown of histamine, allowing higher levels to accumulate. If allergic reactions are an issue, low dose hyperimmune nucleotide blend can be considered.

It is up to YOU to learn about treating chronic illness successfully.

You need to know about the role of optimizing both methyl group production and your capacity for methylation.

This is your opportunity.

My Tuesday evening calls are ongoing. They happen every week. There is no charge to come to the call. It is free forum where you can ask your questions. It’s a great way to clear up confusion, overcome the obstacles you may be having, and get on the path to wellness.

The time: Tuesday at 5:00 PM Pacific Time

(8:00 PM Eastern, 7:00 PM Central, 6:00 PM Mountain)

The number to call in the US: (605) 562-3140

The access code: 691392#

International_Access_Numbers are linked here.

Join us to inform yourself so that you can be proactive about your health!

So excellent! I literally learn something on every single call and I get clarification on things that have been lingering on my mind…
VB

You are giving people a huge gift by empowering them…It’s about helping the patient become their own healer by taking them to a higher level of consciousness…
AL

Thank you so much Dr. Mullan. Thank you so, so much for everything you do.
MS

Wow! I have to tell you, this was such an uplifting call. It’s so nice to hear good news especially about a child. Anxiety, OCD and a host of other mental/psychiatric symptoms have been a huge hurdle for me. So to hear this story of all those awful symptoms totally going away is such a bright light for me!!!!
TR

JOIN US ON TUESDAY NIGHT!

Nancy Mullan MD

Author, lecturer, clinician,
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.

2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank CA 91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620

NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog

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Open Forum Invitation

Dr Mullan would like to invite you to her Open Forum which is held on Tuesday night at 5:00 PM Pacific Time (8:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 7:00 PM Central, 6:00 PM Mountain) in order to answer your questions and introduce you to her work. You may be checking her out to see if you would like to consult her. Or you may not have the option of working with her, but would still like to get her information.

The call in number is (605) 562-3140, and the access code is 691392#.

When you hear Dr. Mullan come on the line, press *6 to get into the question and answer line if you have a question.

This program is not recorded. International call in numbers are linked here.

Thank you for your interest in Dr Mullan’s work.

Nancy Mullan MD

Author, lecturer, clinician
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.

2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank, CA 91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620

NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog

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Oxalate Options — You May Not Have To Eliminate All High Oxalate Foods from Your Diet

Dr. Amy Yasko is very close to publishing a free, online book on interpreting test results. This book will empower you tremendously. Dr. Mullan’s Open Forum announcement has been publishing short segments of Dr. Amy’s work as a “Preview of Coming Attractions”.

Here Dr. Amy takes on the practice of people with high oxalates eliminating all high oxalic acid foods from their diets:

In my thinking, the issue of high oxalate is integrated into a larger concern regarding overall biochemical balance. Aside from diet, there are a number of factors that may contribute to high oxalate levels. A determination of the cause of the high oxalate is obviously important. Triggers for high oxalic acid can be high yeast or fungi, a lack of B12, or low ATP. You make the discernment through interpretation of testing. The reason for the high oxalate, then, guides your decisions as to how you address the problem.

Low B12 is a common cause of high oxalate. Low B12 induces the Krebs cycle to run in a retrograde direction, which increases oxalate. Check your B12 levels on the appropriate tests. Among other functions, lithium transports B12 into your cells. High or very high serum B12 is an indicator for low serum lithium, which can easily be checked by blood test, or hair elements analysis and urine toxic metals and essential elements.

cartoon

 

The Krebs cycle is the energy/ATP generating portion of your mitochondria. Your level of B12 impacts the enzymes in the Krebs cycle, which affects the level of Krebs intermediates. Adequate levels of B12 increase fumarate reductase, which then aids processing oxalate and fumarate (Kurumada and Labbe Science Vol 151 page 1228).

Conversely, lack of B12 leads to increases in citrate lyase and succinate dehydrogenase (Frenkel et al JBC Vol 251 page 2147). The net effect of these enzymatic changes is to increase oxalate and fumarate levels. While fumarate is generally converted to malate, it may happen that when fumarate levels are high enough, some of it is converted to tartarate. Feedback inhibition by high oxalate in addition to high fumarate may control the flow into malate, such that fumarate and oxalate are converted to tartarate. The pathway that leads to formation of tartarate from oxalate has been defined (Nakamura and Ogata, JBC Vol 248 page 528 and Shreeve and Meuter JBC Vol 239 page 729), as has as the path from fumarate to tartarate (Kuni and Hernandez JBC page 201 and Finkle JBC page 349).

Conditions of B12 deficiency, coming either as a result of inadequate B12 intake or absorption, mutations in methyl group producing biochemical pathways, and/or by high level depletion of B12 through endurance training or sports, can lead to increased levels of tartarate, fumarate, and oxalate. High levels of tartarate in the absence of high arabinose, or high levels of fumarate, should lead you to consider supplementing with multiple forms and routes of B12. This includes hydroxyl, adenosyl, and perhaps methyl B12. The forms and relative amounts depend on your personal genetics.

Relative B12 deficiency increases the conversion of citrate to oxalate via citrate lyase. Consider the use of lactoferrin, vitamin K, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, curcumin, benfotiamine, and glutathione to increase the flow from pyruvate through citrate and onto isocitrate as another way to decrease high oxalate.

High leucine in the absence of high valine or isoleucine can occur secondary to low phosphate. This can also cause increases in oxalate. I use ATP and riboflavin 5 phosphate to support phosphate.

High oxalate may also be due to excess glycine that comes secondary to SHMT + or excess iron. Glycine can be checked on amino acid testing, and similarly, iron levels are easy to ascertain. If threonine is high on amino acid testing, it may be an indicator for high oxalic acid.

High levels of oxalate may increase ACE activity. (Umekawa et al J. Am Soc Nephrol Vol 15, 2004).

High levels of citrate or high levels of the intermediates that precede acetyl CoA, ie., pyruvate, lactate, etc., may be an indirect indication of high oxalate. High citrate may be an indirect indication of high oxalate. Use lactoferrin, vitamin K, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, and benfotiamine to get the portion of the cycle from oxalate to citrate moving.

Those who are ACAT + may also have problems converting nutrients from food into the Krebs energy cycle.

Research articles illustrate a relationship between B12 and ATP which seems to present a catch 22. ATP, the fuel generated by your body to drive its biochemical reactions, is created by your Krebs energy cycle. The Krebs cycle needs B12 in order to function optimally. If your Krebs cycle is not functioning optimally, ATP production is reduced. Yet ATP is needed to transport B12 into your cells. However, lithium also plays a role in B12 transport, so lithium levels should be checked and supported as needed. MitoForce or ATP, NADH, vitamin E succinate, and malic acid also play a role in B12 transport.

High levels of sulfur in your system have a negative impact on the regeneration of ATP and NADH. This may be a particular issue for those who are SUOX + – or CBS ++. ATP, NADH, vitamin E succinate, and malic acid may help to regenerate these important intermediates also.

Aluminum and thallium can impair the function of the Krebs cycle, so address thallium and aluminum if they are found to be elevated.

So, the interventions recommended to reduce high oxalate should depend upon its cause. Your response to high oxalate should not be a knee jerk reaction to reduce high oxalate foods in your diet, except for immediate palliation.

It is up to YOU to learn about treating your chronic illness successfully. The Tuesday night Open Forum is your chance to do this. The call is done in a question and answer format. It is not a lecture. Come with your questions. Press *6 to get into the Q and A line.

The Open Forum is held on Tuesday night at 5:00 PM Pacific Time (8:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 7:00 PM Central, 6:00 PM Mountain) in order to answer your questions and introduce you to her work. You may be checking her out to see if you would like to consult her. Or you may not have the option of working with her, but would still like to get her information.

The call in number is (605) 562-3140, and the access code is 691392#.

When you hear Dr. Mullan come on the line, press *6 to get into the question and answer line if you have a question.

This program is not recorded.  International call in numbers are linked here.

Thank you for your interest in Dr Mullan’s work.

Nancy Mullan MD

Author, lecturer, clinician
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.

2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank, CA 91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620

NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Open Forum Invitation

Dr Mullan would like to invite you to her Open Forum which is held on Tuesday night at 5:00 PM Pacific Time (8:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 7:00 PM Central, 6:00 PM Mountain) in order to answer your questions and introduce you to her work. You may be checking her out to see if you would like to consult her. Or you may not have the option of working with her, but would still like to get her information.

The call in number is (605) 562-3140, and the access code is 691392#.

When you hear Dr. Mullan come on the line, press *6 to get into the question and answer line if you have a question.

This program is not recorded. International call in numbers are linked here.

Thank you for your interest in Dr Mullan’s work.

Nancy Mullan MD

Author, lecturer, clinician
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.

2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank, CA 91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620

NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Methionine – ‘First among Equals’ of Essential Amino Acids

Methionine is a super important amino acid for methylation reactions. It turns into S-adenosyl methionine, SAMe, which is your body’s main methyl donor. Beyond that, it supplies sulfur for detoxification pathways, and acts as a scavenger for pro-oxidant molecules. It needs to be supplied by your diet or supplementation, and your GI tract needs to be in reasonable shape to get it across its mucosal membrane.

In her upcoming book, Dr. Amy Yasko gives this advice about maintaining its levels:

Methionine is a critical part of your cycle for making methyl groups. Low levels of methionine suggest a need to support both the long route, the pathway that uses the MTR/MTRR enzymes, and the short cut, the BHMT pathway.

Amino Assist Spray or capsules can be added for low levels of methionine. For methylation cycle support, use PS/PC/PE, DHA, and All in One. This supports the short cut pathway. Then, MethylMate A can be added. MethylMate A and short cut support can be added even while lithium is still low. Check lithium on a HMT prior to adding extra B12 or higher levels of Black Bear, a source of B12 and molybdenum. Finally, once lithium is in balance, add extra B12 and MethylMate B.

If methionine remains low, you can add sprinkles of methionine. If you are adding methionine, be sure you have support for the methylation cycle in place so you can process the methionine and homocysteine that is generated as a result.

Alternately, high methionine is sometimes seen in those who are ACAT +. The use of ACAT/BHMT capsules may help to restore methionine to healthy, balanced levels. High levels of methionine have also been reported to cause increased tryptophan levels, as well as lower serotonin and GABA. Theoretically, this is due to competition for B vitamins, in particular B6 or P5P. Therefore, if your methionine levels are high, consider Ultimate B, and check tryptophan on a UAA, as well as relative levels of glutamate to GABA.

There is a lot you need to know about getting and /or staying well. My Tuesday night call is your chance to do this. The call is done in a question and answer format. It is not a lecture, although I do jump off of the question and lecture on the topic at hand. Come with your questions. Press *6 to get into the Q and A line.

I discuss how to balance your biochemistry with nutritional supplements that bypass problem genetics.

It is up to YOU to learn about treating chronic illness successfully.

You need to know about the role of optimizing both methyl group production and your capacity for methylation.

This is your opportunity.

My Tuesday evening calls are ongoing. They happen every week. There is no charge to come to the call. It is free forum where you can ask your questions. It’s a great way to clear up confusion, overcome the obstacles you may be having, and get on the path to wellness.

The time: Tuesday at 5:00 PM Pacific Time

(8:00 PM Eastern, 7:00 PM Central, 6:00 PM Mountain)

The number to call in the US: (605) 562-3140

The access code: 691392#

International access numbers are available here.

Join us to inform yourself so that you can be proactive about your health!

So excellent! I literally learn something on every single call and I get clarification on things that have been lingering on my mind…
VB

You are giving people a huge gift by empowering them…It’s about helping the patient become their own healer by taking them to a higher level of consciousness…
AL

Thank you so much Dr. Mullan. Thank you so, so much for everything you do.
MS

Wow! I have to tell you, this was such an uplifting call. It’s so nice to hear good news especially about a child. Anxiety, OCD and a host of other mental/psychiatric symptoms have been a huge hurdle for me. So to hear this story of all those awful symptoms totally going away is such a bright light for me!!!!
TR

JOIN US ON TUESDAY NIGHT!

Nancy Mullan MD

Author, lecturer, clinician,
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.

2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank CA 91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620

NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Dr. Amy’s Take on Folate vs. Folic Acid

This material is taken directly from Dr. Amy’s upcoming free online book about what to do with test results:

There are two key reasons to support with low doses of both folate and folic acid, in addition to the use of specific types of folate, such as 5 methyl THF, that help to bypass mutations like MTHFR C677T. First, since 1959 it has been known that “folic acid deficiency results in inability to degrade formiminoglutamic acid (FIGLU) to glutamic acid, so that FIGLU accumulates in excessive amounts and is excreted in the urine”.(Luhby, Am J Clin Nutr). FILGU levels are measured on the MAP test, and high levels suggest a need to use low dose folate and/or folic acid support.

The second reason to use low dose folic acid and/or folate is the pathway that involves MTHFS. A low dose form of plain folate or folic acid is supplemented in part to address possible MTHFS mutations, especially since they are not generally identified on most nutrigenomic tests. MTHFS is another enzyme in the methylation pathway. It functions at 11:00 in the folate cycle, between 5 formyl THF (folinic acid) on the way to produce tetrahydrofolate at 12:00. MTHFS functions to address SHMT and the formation of the purines guanine and adenine for DNA and RNA.

If there is a mutation that impacts the ability of MTHFS to function, it can increase folinic acid to high levels and limit the synthesis of purines, as well as decrease the THF level. In this program, my policy is to use only low dose folinic acid, to add nucleotides to support DNA and RNA production, and to use low dose folic acid along with probiotics as a secondary way to make THF. In this way, I bypass the impact of any possible MTHFS mutation, even if I do not have nutrigenomic data regarding this gene.

This again highlights why I want to think about all aspects of the pathway when adding support. I choose to add only low dose folinic acid to help keep SHMT in balance without allowing the levels of folinic to climb, which might happen if you are adding high dose folinic and have a MTHFS mutation. I add nucleotides to supply purines and pyrimidines in case the pathway for their formation is not fully functional. I add low dose folic acid to have a secondary route for making THF that consumes excess glutamate in doing this.

The rationale behind also adding low dose 5 methyl THF is that the way to bypass an MTHFR C677T mutation is with 5 methyl THF. If you look at the biochemical diagrams you can see this. No amount of folinic acid, folate, or folic acid is going to bypass a MTHFR C677T mutation. So, the whole conversation about folic acid or folate is actually misplaced, as the real issue is 5 methyl THF.

There is some sort of misconception out there that folate will bypass MTHFR. To be clear, 5 methyl THF is the only way to bypass MTHFR C677T. I have it in low dose form in both All in One as well as MethylMate B. If you are C677T ++, using high dose 5 methyl THF can trigger more detox than you can handle, especially if you are an adult. This is why All in One uses only low dose 5 methyl THF, and my stand alone source of 5 methyl THF, MethylMate B, is a liquid, so you have exquisite control over increasing or decreasing its dose.

MOST of the folate that is used for this program is 5 methyl THF, with some low dosefolinic acid. Folinic is useful for those who are SHMT + or have iron levels that may increase SHMT activity. Some low dose folic acid and/or folate is helpful for other aspects of the pathway, and that is why some very, very low dose folic acid is included in the formulation.

To summarize, I do feel that some low dose folinic acid is needed to help to control SHMT, which is why All in One also has some low dose folinic. I do not like high dose folinic acid as those with MTHFS mutations can have a problem with it. Finally, for adequate processing of FIGLU, I want some low dose folate and/or folic acid in the system. Because the various forms of folate compete with each other for transport into your cells, the ratio in the All in One is mostly 5 methylTHF, with a lesser amount of folinic acid, and finally the least amount of folic acid.

Now I am going to be very specific with regard to why I use low dose folic acid rather than folate. Folate is basically a chain of glutamates. The difference between folic acid and folate is the stability and the length of their glutamate chains. So, if you are MTHFR C677T++ and you take high dose folate, you potentially have a chain of unused glutamate molecules left in your system. You cannot process it efficiently to 5 methyl THF because of your SNPs. You run the risk of folate breaking down to release glutamate into your system. STEP 1 of this program is focused on glutamate/GABA balance. I have made significant progress for some individuals merely by getting their glutamate and GABA into balance. Thus, I am not choosing to add high doses of a form of folate that could break down into glutamate, especially in the population I work with.

One of the main differences between folic acid and folate is that folic acid has a shorter glutamate chain than folate. Folic acid is also more stable, so it is less likely to break down into glutamate. I am using only a tiny bit of folic acid, to allow FIGLU to convert to glutamic acid. I am not using high dose folic acid, as that is not going to bypass MTHFR in any event. I understand there are other programs out there that use higher doses of plain folate. Perhaps those programs are less concerned with the glutamate issue.

I have specific reasons for the choices I make in terms of supplements and the forms that I use. Natural folate has more glutamate residues and can break down more easily to release those glutamate molecules into your system, so I prefer to use a VERY low dose of folic acid. There are only approximately 15 micrograms of folic acid in All in One and about 25 micrograms in Ultimate B. This program uses some very, very low dose folic acid for the reactions that need it, but the focus is more heavily on the use of 5 methyl THF and low dose folinic acid.

The use of LOW dose folic acid is a choice, to limit the risk of increased glutamate in your system. The RDA for folate/folic acid is 300 micrograms for a child that is 1 year old, up to 1,000 micrograms daily for an individual 19 years of age or older. Thus the 15 to 40 micrograms used for this program is not an issue, especially since the body does need some folate/folic acid aside from the need for 5 methyl THF and folinic. To put this in an easily understandable perspective, a bowl of cheerios has 400 micrograms of folic acid, as compared to the 15 to 40 micrograms used in this program.

In addition to making rational choices in terms of folic acid versus folate, and only using low dose folinic out of consideration for possible MTHFS mutations, I am already taking into account the need to balance the production of purines, thymidine levels, controlling SHMT, and producing methionine from homocysteine with the supplementation I have in place for the methylation cycle.

To reiterate the approach: (1) get the BHMT pathway moving with PS/PE/PC plus DHA, SAMe if tolerated, All in One, Ultimate B, and low dose methylation RNA; (2) add some low dose lithium support with BeCalm, and run a HMT to be sure you have checked lithium to see if you need low dose lithium orotate. If aggression is an issue, pay close attention to potassium and rubidium on your HMT. If your lithium is very low, run a HMT every 3 to 4 months to keep an eye on levels; (3) once lithium is in balance, you can add extra B12; (4) add methylmate A and B to be sure you have the methylation cycle fully supported; (5) if you have SHMT + status or high iron on HMT and UEE, use SHMT support along with step 1 and 2 above; (6) be sure you have probiotics in place, focusing on Lactobacillus and Bifidobacter; (7) run a HMT to check lithium every few months once you have extra B12 in place.

It is up to YOU to learn about treating whatever chronic illness you may have successfully.

This is your opportunity.

My Tuesday evening calls are ongoing.  They happen every week.  There is no charge to come to the call.  It is free forum where you can ask your questions.  It’s a great way to clear up confusion, overcome the obstacles you may be having, and get on the path to wellness.

The call is done in a question and answer format.  It is not a lecture, although I do jump off of the question and lecture on the topic at hand.  Come with your questions.  Press *6 to get into the Q and A line.

The time:  Tuesday at 5:00 PM Pacific Time

(8:00 PM Eastern, 7:00 PM Central, 6:00 PM Mountain)

The number to call in the US: (605) 562-3140

The access code: 691392#

International call in numbers are linked here.

Join us to inform yourself so that you can be proactive about your health!

So excellent!  I literally learn something on every single call and I get clarification on things that have been lingering on my mind…
VB

You are giving people a huge gift by empowering them…It’s about helping the patient become their own healer by taking them to a higher level of consciousness…
AL

Thank you so much Dr. Mullan.  Thank you so, so much for everything you do.
MS

Wow!  I have to tell you, this was such an uplifting call.  It’s so nice to hear good news especially about a child.  Anxiety, OCD and a host of other mental/psychiatric symptoms have been a huge hurdle for me.  So to hear this story of all those awful symptoms totally going away is such a bright light for me!!!!
TR

JOIN US ON TUESDAY NIGHT!

Nancy Mullan MD

Author, lecturer, clinician,
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.

2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank CA  91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620

NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Lithium — Pivotal in Your Recovery!

For a comprehensive review of this subject, click on this link:
http://www.dramyyasko.com/resources/webisodes/lithium-connection-webisode/
 
These are your Cliff Notes:

Lithium has been known for years to be useful for bipolar disorder. Despite all that is known about lithium and its impact on biochemical pathways, no one has defined the mechanism by which lithium has its impact on bipolar disorder. It is likely to be an effect on multiple pathways. There are a number of enzymes in the body that are known to be impacted and inhibited by lithium.

Lithium comes together with methylation at COMT, the enzyme catechol-o-methyl-transferase. COMT breaks down dopamine and nor epinephrine. Dopamine is a critical neurotransmitter for motivation, focus and attention, among other functions. Nor epinephrine is involved with modulating the impact of stressors. Both are central to nervous system function.

COMT uses methyl groups to accomplish this deactivation. COMT – – breaks down dopamine at a steady even rate and uses significant numbers of methyl groups. COMT ++ breaks down these neurotransmitters more slowly and uses fewer methyl groups.

We know that giving a patient more methyl groups than they can use produces symptoms. They get mood swings and start to look bipolar. Children will become hyperactive, ‘stimmy’ or get other symptoms when they are put on methyl B12 if it is too much for them.

Lithium may inhibit the production of a central enzyme in the sulfur system, thioredoxin reductase. The detail and complexity surrounding this issue is explained in the presentation you can access at Dr Amy’s webinar link posted above.

It appears that lithium may be increasing the production of COMT and inhibiting the production of thioredoxin reductase. COMT and thioredoxin reductase have genes that are on opposite strands of chromosome 22. Their promoter regions overlap which implies some mutual regulation. Having a shared promoter means that at any given time you can make either the COMT transcript or you can make thioredoxin, but you cannot make both.

This circumstance is analogous to a roadway being closed down to one lane. The line of traffic can move only in one direction at a time. One lane is stopped while the other one can go. A shared promoter generates the same situation in gene transcription. You can make either COMT or thioredoxin, but not both at the same time.

Dr Amy emphasizes that this is her hypothesis, it is not scientific fact. But based on this hypothesis, she started looking carefully at lithium levels and opened up a whole new area in her program. Using this hypothesis makes a difference for patients. She noticed that MTR+ is associated with excess lithium excretion. An out of balance methylation cycle will also cause increased lithium excretion. The vast, vast majority of patients using this protocol come in with low lithium levels.

Dr Amy suggests only low dose lithium support because lithium also inhibits ribonucleotide reductase. Ribonucleotide reductase takes ribonucleotides, ie, RNAs, and breaks them down into building blocks for DNA and other RNAs. So one of the toxic impacts of high dose lithium is its impact on RNA breakdown. You need to support with DNA building blocks, for example using Nucleotide Immune Support. The RNA formulas also supply these building blocks.

Lithium is an essential trace element. You must get it from your diet. The average intake of lithium from the diet should be up to 3100 mcg, or 3.1 mg. Dr Amy wants to supplement with very low level lithium, around 2.5 mg. She wants to do it consistently and she does not want to get near biologic doses. What it takes to actually increase a patient’s lithium levels can be significantly more, especially with sicker patients.

You have to keep watching the lithium and cobalt levels on a UEE. High lithium levels on a UEE may indicate excess excretion, but when cobalt, the oxidized form of B12, starts to show, you know the lithium level is coming into balance and you can start to push the long route instead of just the short route. 

Why is this important?

There is a connection between lithium and COMT, bipolar disorder and SZ. It is possible that imbalances in the COMT pathway need regulation by low dose lithium in order to get the kind of levels of COMT that you need for proper dopamine processing. When the levels of COMT in the brains of patients with SZ and bipolar disorder were compared with normal controls, the levels of COMT in those affected were lower than in controls. Lithium seems to increase the activity of COMT.

Lithium induces B12 transport into the cells thus driving the long route. This can happen with just the standing levels of B12 without additional supplementation. B12 binding capacity as well as white count will go up in the presence of lithium. B12 deficiency is known to lead to degeneration of the central nervous system and psychiatric disturbances such as affective disorders and manic psychosis. Violent criminals as a group have the lowest levels of lithium in hair. There is not only a relationship between lithium, B12 and folate, but also between low lithium and anxiety, aggression, bipolar disorder and SZ.

In studies with patients known to be low in B12, the following psychiatric manifestations were reported to remit with vitamin B12 therapy: confusion , hallucinations, delusions, disorientation, confabulation, anxiety, restlessness, fatigue, depression, irritability, sleepiness, psychosis, stupor, slowed ability to process thoughts, decreased memory, acute delirium, mania, apathy, lack of energy, weakness, violent behavior, flight of ideas, negativism and acute paranoid states. These symptoms may occur in the absence of hematological evidence of B12 deficiency.

So certain behavioral problems, depression and learning disability could be caused or aggravated by low nutritional intake of lithium coupled with marginal deficiencies of B12.

Lithium has a direct effect on nor epinephrine pathways. Lithium indirectly inhibits thioredoxin reductase. There is an inverse relationship between thioredoxin reductase and COMT, so it may be that lithium increases COMT leading to decreased nor-epinephrine.
 
Other positives of lithium:

Lithium stimulates tyrosine hydroxylase, which is a secondary pathway to dopamine production.

Lithium has neuroprotective actions against a variety of insults. It increases GABA activity. It helps to protect against glutamate excitotoxicity by inhibiting the NMDA receptor induced calcium influx.

Lithium plays a role with sodium and potassium balance.

Lithium may help to repair neurons and reduce some of the trauma after injury.

It induces enhancement of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in human brain tissue.

It plays a role with respect to myelination by enhancing the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor.

And finally, lithium has been shown to be protective in Alzheimer’s disease.
 
Lithium and thyroid.

Lithium has an impact on thyroid hormone production because it competes with iodine for uptake from the GI tract. We suggest getting around this problem by painting a 2’’ square of iodine on your skin and watching how long it takes for your body to absorb it.

If it is gone in 1 hour, you need iodine. Keep painting it on daily for transdermal supplementation.

If it stays on for 24 hours, you have enough iodine in your system. You can extrapolate the times between those two limits. Given all that has been said about the positives of using lithium if you are low in it, it is best not to just toss it aside because someone told you it was bad for thyroid. You may need both lithium and iodine. You can get both in the way just described.
 
It is up to YOU to learn about treating chronic illness successfully.
 
You need to know about the role of lithium in optimizing methyl group production and all of the other ways in which lithium impacts your health.
 
This is your opportunity.
 
My Tuesday evening calls are ongoing.  They happen every week.  There is no charge to come to the call.  It is free forum where you can ask your questions.  It’s a great way to clear up confusion, overcome the obstacles you may be having, and get on the path to wellness.
 
The call is done in a question and answer format.  It is not a lecture, although I do jump off of the question and lecture on the topic at hand.  Come with your questions.  Press *6 to get into the Q and A line.
 
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Join us to inform yourself so that you can be proactive about your health!
 
So excellent!  I literally learn something on every single call and I get clarification on things that have been lingering on my mind…
VB
 
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Thank you so much Dr. Mullan.  Thank you so, so much for everything you do.
MS
 
Wow!  I have to tell you, this was such an uplifting call.  It’s so nice to hear good news especially about a child.  Anxiety, OCD and a host of other mental/psychiatric symptoms have been a huge hurdle for me.  So to hear this story of all those awful symptoms totally going away is such a bright light for me!!!!
TR
 

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Nancy Mullan MD
 
Author, lecturer, clinician,
Dr. Nancy Mullan is best known for her natural treatment of chronic illness, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, Lyme and MTHFR+.
 
2829 Burbank Blvd., Suite 202, Burbank CA  91505
T: (818) 954-9267 – F: (818) 954-0620
 
NancyMullanMD@aol.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com
http://www.NancyMullanMD.com/blog
 

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